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We’re good through 2032 at the following link.

Destiny 2 is keeping my attention. Easily noticeable by the fact that it was really the only thing I played all week. They’ve given us some strings to keep pulling us along week by week, but if it’s not enough they risk losing our interest early cause we finished, and if it’s too much, they risk losing us to not wanting to put in the time for what we eventually get for it. I can see the tough act of balancing they have to figure out, but I’m still enjoying it so I’ll still carry on. For now.

We won’t be having a show next week. Most of us – actually, ALL of us will be out of town for the weekend, but when we return we’ll be one week out from E3. Plenty to speculate on for the return episode and plenty to actually talk about from the E3 fallout on the one after.

 

We renewed our license at the following link.

Just when I thought I was out, they pull me back in. Destiny 2 got another expansion. Bigger, it seems, than the last one, which is good, although short on story it expands afterwards. Which is what it should do, but that story could have been better. I can look past that though if it keeps giving me more carrots on the end of the stick, and that’s happening. The bug hasn’t completely bit into me yet, but it feels close. Time will tell just how this ends up, but it’s better than before.

On the surface, it looks like we’re getting more things to chase so that’ll keep me interested, but that’s only on the surface. Once that chase begins, it’s really got to hold me and that’ll be where I really grade this new expansion. How long can it keep me coming back?

You know how we cover Destiny, here. It was almost weekly talk of the game since it was played so much and then nothing. For months it was nothing because nothing was there. Now there’s something but is it enough?

We’re about to find out.

 

We can google that for you at the following link.

I have finally started God Of War, but that really isn’t saying much for me and my way of playing games. Which brings us to a small side discussion about having too many collectibles in games, or branching paths in something that should really be more linear. It’s all subjective to the player than the game, so it isn’t really any sort of fault I put on the developers. It’s just my oh-look-a-squirrel way of playing games.

There’s also a bit of a rant about video game trailers as well, but I think I’m being extremely cynical with that way of thinking. The point is, a trailer for a game is made to sell you on the game. We complain about movies putting all the best parts in a trailer, but that’s EXACTLY what a video game trailer will do. They want to show you all the best parts to hold your interest and get your money. This doesn’t really apply to franchise games, so much, when we know what to expect, but for new IPs, you’re going to see the best of what they have to offer – but it’s usually in cinematic form, rather than something significant like gameplay. Cinematics being the least percentage of a video game (unless you’re a Kojima game) and gameplay being the most of anything else you ever do in a video game. In the marketing world of video games, I’m probably in the minority, but you’re going to sell me a whole lot more on your product by showing me what’s inside (gameplay) rather than the art on the box (cinematic).

Then again, with games like God Of War, the cinematic is the gameplay. And it’s amazing.

 

We put it on a bomb, an actual bomb, at the following link.

We haven’t spoken to Twisted Pixel in a few years but we hope to change that and keep a regular correspondence with them and the show. We used to have them on every time they released a new game and then they went silent for a while. You’ll find out why when you hear our interview with Amanda May in this episode.

We all played games this week, but the only thing new for me was the Detroit demo. I was already sold on the game from all the branching paths, but the demo showed me this was much better than Beyond Two Souls – their last effort at the “your choices matter” type of gameplay style. Because in that game, it didn’t. At all. However, Detroit looks like that course was corrected. We’ll see later this month when it releases.

At some point I should probably start (and finish) God Of War. I’m a bit behind.

 

It’s behind a glass display case at the following link.

I never started out doing this show to reach any kind of goals. It was, and still is, a great hobby of mine and everyone else involved. It just comes with perks every now and then. Like realizing that you’ve not only spoken with, but also met and visited the people and places behind your favorite games. And not just recent favorite games, but the games that made you. The games that shaped who you’d become as a gamer.

MYST was that game for me, no doubt about it. That goes all the way back to 1993. And I have been in love with every game in the series ever since, never once ever expecting that I’d get to talk to one of the people who created the game, but also getting to meet him and visit the studio.

It will never not be special to me to have these people on our show.

 

We think that’s too much money for an Atari at the following link.

Sometimes when we don’t play anything for a week, we have a reason. Maybe not a good reason, but we have a reason. Or, we just make up games for the things we did. For instance, I played Homeowner Simulator and Matt put some time in with Car Repair Simulator. I actually did a marathon of mine while Matt only played like a single level and then actually got around to putting time in with some video games.

I’m hoping this week will let me get in a variety of game playing, because there is nothing addictive or really anything that you get from playing Homeowner Simulator. Especially not the level I was playing.

 

We kinda get off on a rant at the following link.

Far Cry 5 is out and I couldn’t be any less interested. It’s just not pulling me in. I don’t know if it’s the genre or the setting or the name, but watching videos of game play there’s just no hook for me. About the ONLY thing that raises my interest level is the damn fly fishing. Which is exactly all I did when I played the demo at PAX last year. Luckily, Matt and Nate both seem to be enjoying it.

As for me, I’m still playing Burnout Paradise and also, apparently, having some sort of strong opinion on how voice actors don’t keep me coming back to a game or a movie. It’s a tangent I got off on early in this episode and got completely lost in the rant so I apologize for that.

But seriously, character tone is more important than vocal tone – unless it’s the Muppets and then you better have a real good mix of both.

 

We’re on an adventure at the following link.

This is the one where we play Dungeons & Dragons. For some of us it was our first time and for others they were well experienced. That likely goes for the same for a lot of you who listened or will listen and watch this.

It was an experiment that seemed to be pretty successful, but we need to hear from you on that. Did this translate well for you? Is it something you enjoyed? Most of all, is this something you’d want us to do again?

We always welcome feedback to the show, but it isn’t something we always seek out. We’ve just always done what we do week in and week out and go from there, but this is one of the cases where we really need to hear from you on how successful this actually turned out. Where ever you might be reading this or watching this or listening to this, leave a comment or send us a tweet or an email.

Tell us what you thought. It’s the only way for us to know if we should do this again.

 

We jumped into an ocean but landed in a puddle at the following link.

Sea Of Thieves is the worst kind of game. The kind that show an amazing amount of potential, but already released into the wild. The game didn’t need more time, it just needed more to it. There’s a few hours of fun on the surface and then there’s nothing. Sailing a ship with friends is fun, but it only lasts so long when you’re doing the same thing over and over again without any kind of significant reward for doing it. There is no progression in the game. Not the kind of progression to keep you going further and further with it. It’s a shallow as they come, but it holds so much promise. It has one or two really good things nailed down but it isn’t enough to carry the game. It isn’t enough to justify the full price (we HIGHLY recommend the Game Pass option). With more, this might have been something special. Hell, with more, I have used the game pass but promptly gone out and bought a copy if it held onto me, but it doesn’t. The game’s a giant bag of air with a few chips at the bottom. But it could have been so much more.

Next week’s episode may or may not be your cup of tea. Or grog. Or mead. Whatever, we’re playing DnD live on the air for the very first time (as well as the first time for some of us on the show). We’re not sure how well it will go, but that’s the fun in experimenting. We hope it works. We hope you like it. And if it doesn’t or if you don’t, we hope you’ll come back the week after for our usual show format.

But we really hope it works AND you like it. Because it’s honestly been fun week after week of learning new things about DnD and we hope that fun will translate over the air for all of you.

 

We found out dice rolling can be really loud at the following link.

Stepping back into Burnout Paradise was like watching a favorite movie you hadn’t seen in a long time. Some of it felt fresh, but all of it was fondly remembered. It did nothing but bring a smile to my face and was amazing to see the world from the beginning again. This isn’t anything like the remaster for Shadow Of The Colossus. This is a low effort polish on a not-near-as-old game like that was and, really, the Shadow remaster set a bar I don’t think we’ll ever see again except from the same company who did that one.

But I don’t care. It’s put the Burnout game back in the heads of gamers who played it and those who missed it. It’s getting people talking about Burnout again and I really hope EA is listening because it’s been 10 years. Make another one already and drop that stupid obsession with your Need For Speed franchise.

We’ve got a longer segment at the end here talking about our DnD episode. We rolled dice for our stats (it got loud, sorry) and talked more about the creation of our characters. We also spent about an hour or so off-air after the show going over more of it and getting everything hammered out. Next week, we’ll get a taste of the story our GameMaster has crafted for us and the week following that (March 31st), we’ll have our first ever live Dungeons & Dragons game on the air!

 

We’re explaining it like we’re five at the following link.

Date’s set. We’re aiming for March 31st as to when we’ll do our DnD episode. Beginning with this episode, we’ll devote a segment of the show as our build up to that episode so you can see and hear us progress through the stages of doing something like this. This episodes segment comes near the end where we try to get a grasp on the idea of character creation. It’s…a slow process.

Meanwhile, in the video gaming world, this past week I returned to a game I’d only ever played at industry shows but never did dive into it when it released. And I loved every bit of it. And this week will see me return to a game I’ve always loved but I haven’t REALLY touched in ten years.

Sometimes revisiting the past doesn’t hold up to what you remember. But that’s okay. It doesn’t have to change your memories of the past. Those are still yours and yours as you remember them. So keep that in mind if something feels different a second time around. Doesn’t mean it has to ruin your memory of the first time.

 

We’re rolling for initiative at the following link.

Doing something you’ve never done before can be scary and fun and so many other things at the same time. However, this isn’t one of those times. It’s all fun and exciting. There’s nothing scary about it. You’ll hear this in the first segment of the show how an idea usually comes together for us – instantaneous, it would seem.

So, here’s the thing, we stumbled upon the idea of doing a live D&D session on the air. Two of us on the show know what this involved and two of us on the show have no idea what will happen. So that (we hope) will be actually entertaining to listen to over the radio and watch on Twitch/YouTube.

Experimentation is a lot of fun when doing things like this. We’ve done music only episodes before and those work cause, well…radio, right? But this is totally going outside of the norm I think for something on FM broadcast radio and it might work, and it might not, but we’ve gotta try and see what happens. If it doesn’t work, then whatever, we tried and there – it exists at out attempt to do something different. If we actually pull it off well enough, we could make it a regular and ongoing thing and it totally opens the door for new experiments to try. Playing a boardgame on the radio might not sound like it’ll work, but radio is nothing but theater of the mind anyway so if we can be descriptive and imaginative enough with it – I think we can pull it off.

You’ll find out when we do.

 

We’re saying it for the last time at the following link.

Actually, we’re not. We know it won’t be the last time we have to say that video games don’t cause violence, because we knew that the last time we had to say it. The cycle repeats over and over again. It’s always a conversation worth having, but it’s also a conversation that will never end, apparently. We don’t expect our few minutes of it at the end of this episode to sway anyone’s opinion on the matter, but we do hope it’ll give you an idea of where we stand on it, though that was probably already well apparent to most of you.

Outside of that, I’m still collecting Steelbooks and RJ is still hunting monsters. Hopefully we’ll find out next week what Matt’s been up to.

Finally, a congratulations to Nate. He’s been away from the show for awhile but still keeps us up to date on things. He spent his time away getting engaged, actually.

One quest ends and another begins.

 

We’re unwrapping our booster packs at the following link.

I never did catch on the to card game craze that happened in the early days of the genre. I don’t know why. I knew people that played it or saw it being played but it never grabbed hold of me. No one ever sat me down and showed me the ropes of it and that even extends to modern CCG’s and virtual CCG’s. I still, to this day, have no idea how to play Hearthstone. Or GWENT, or any of them. I can play all manner of card games with traditional playing cards, but not the CCG’s.

I’m hoping to change that.

What hasn’t changed is the games I’ve played. Still hunting monsters in a world. But I’ve been having an itch to get back into Civilization. I’ve talked about this before but that’s a game that needs a considerable length of time ahead of it with nothing on my plate. Because “just one more turn” becomes 100 more turns and hours fly by in minutes. You think I’m exaggerating and making a joke, but that is rock hard solid truth and nowhere near a joke, I assure you.

What is a joke, is how I ever thought I would want to play a realistic medieval RPG like Kingdom Come, but here we are.

 

We played 13 hours and only finished the prologue at the following link.

This may read like a review, but it’s not. The last time I played Shadow Of The Colossus was when it released – on my birthday in 2005. That was it. I never went back and replayed it and I haven’t even started on the “remaster” that was released this week. By the way, we tend to think of these video game remasters as being a few touch ups to display on larger and higher definition screens with other quality of life improvements, but this particular remaster was built from the ground up to do all of that and has now set the bar on how remasters should aspire to be – just to make that clear.

Anyway, Shadow Of The Colossus is a game that I hold very dear and I think a lot of other gamers do as well and they all have their reasons. It’s a phenomenal game with nothing but boss battles. That’s it. There’s 16 of them in total and that’s all you do. Go out and bring down the Colossus one by one. It’s just you, them, your horse, and a massive wide open land to explore. No other inhabitants besides a few birds here and there. And maybe that’s the appeal to me…the connection. The isolation and solitude of that and there’s very little in the way of dialogue because it is just you and these giant beings. There’s a story being told as well, and I refuse to spoil that here, but the ending of the game is less to do with the story told and more to do with the journey getting there. It’s…complicated to tell without spoiling. And, it’s a feat most games would have trouble reaching and I’m not so sure anyone else has tried it before because of what publishers feel that we, as gamers, need. But they aren’t looking at what we need, they are looking at what we’ll pay for and what we’ll keep coming back for again and again.

Because they don’t want us to pick up a game in 2005 only to play it a single time and never return. And yet this game still remains top of mind when it comes to some of our most cherished experiences in gaming.