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You are currently browsing the In-Game Chat archives for April, 2016.

We’re streaming in 4K at the following link.

In this episode we have an interview with Atul Mehra from Spearhead games about “Stories: The Path Of Destinies”. I praise the game enough as it is throughout the whole episode so if you’re looking for my comments, just watch the show and the interview. Choices in games often mean something but they have little of the weight that the game would make you think you’re having. Except in Stories. Every choice carries with it a new path bringing you to different choices had you chosen differently just before. Where last week I was talking about how Quantum Break was trying to make your choices matter….well, nothing can hold a candle to what Stories is doing.

We also take some time and unbox a few LootCrate’s that came in. These sort of things work a whole lot better on video than they do in audio so give it a look if you have the time.

 

We’re talking about that one guy from that one thing at the following link.

I seem to be on a roll lately with games that provide choices. I’m currently playing a game that plays entirely on the choices you make. However, in this episode I talk about Quantum Break. Spoiler – it isn’t that great. It’s also not that bad either. Look, I like Remedy, the makers of Quantum Break. Max Payne and Max Payne 2 means I’ll always come back to see what they have on offer. Alan Wake wasn’t great either but it also wasn’t bad. They tackle the old familiar “your choices matter” mechanic and they somewhat succeed with it by not making it matter too much. While other games that try this want to make it seem like you’ll have an direct change in how the game is played or how the story ends, Quantum Break doesn’t do that. It’s the smaller ripples. So while you make that choice and you see it realized in their live-action segment of their “TV show”, you easily understand that what you just did won’t make a single difference on how the game will end.

Then again, with the story as lacking as it is, you might not care either way.

 

Our short attention spa… at the following link.

The way we get our information is constantly changing. It’s always evolving to keep up with society in general. The easier it became to get info the more info people wanted. Magazines/Newspapers to the internet is the single best example I can give you in a broad sense. But it’s evolved even further than that. Video reviews of games likely get a whole lot more clicks than written reviews. Even more than that, quick-look videos probably get more clicks than video reviews. We want the info as soon as possible and we want you to get to the point quicker than you thought you were getting there.

So where does a nearly 2 hour plus show about video games fit in? Background noise, work commute listening, we’re not sure, but you folks continue to tune in live and download the show every week so until that stops, we’ll keep doing this.

 

WHY DID YOU SAY THAT NAME?!?! at the following link.

Physical games (not sports), board games, mixtures between the two and electronic gaming. Outside the realm of “video” gaming there exists another love of most gamers and it resides in those three categories. Board games come in many flavors and are usually well known by most of us. Finding the right ones – where everything clicks with you and your group – is part of the adventure there. The other two bookending that selection aren’t as well known or readily available. These are games like the room ones where you’re locked in a room and have to find your way out. A mirror maze, the “2 Rooms & A Boom” we mention on the show itself. There’s fun to be had there and I wish these were on the same list of availability as board and video games are. There’s something fun about physically playing a game – and not one that requires any sort of athletic skill, but just you and some other people living a game for a few hours. I’m drawn to it and I can’t really put my finger quite on why, but…I bet my obsession with VR likely stems, at least a little, from this sort of thing.