We’re trying to take the moral high ground at the following link.

Is Spider-Man classified as an open-world game? I mean, I’m sure it qualifies for a lot of different types of games, but is open-world one of them?

If I thought so before playing Red Dead Redemption 2, I don’t feel that way anymore. Open world games now have a set bar and RDR2 is it. I can throw out all the cliches of open world gaming and the feeling of a living, breathing world, and it all easily applies to what RDR2 is doing, but…there’s an ecosystem here. Both literally and figuratively.

It was dark in the town of Valentine and I was on my horse about to ride back to my camp when a drunk guy was stumbling around asking for help. All I did was give him direction to where he said his home was. I got honor points for it and he walked off. I didn’t expect anymore than that. Eventually, I didn’t go back to my camp. I wandered through some back alleys and back yards in Valentine and happened to bump into the drunk guy again. This time he was at his house (exactly where he’d vaguely told me it would be) yelling at his wife to let him in. She didn’t. He threw up on the porch and laid down outside his door.

I feel like any other game, that drunk guy would have walked away after I helped him and then vanished. Deed done. Interaction complete. Removed from the map. But not in RDR2. It lives. It breathes. And it does so with or without you having anything to do it. Makes me wonder what would have happened to the guy if I’d just ignored him or gave him the wrong directions.

Now I need to try Assassin’s Creed Odyssey.

 

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